Geology

Drag, Norway

Drag is situated in Northern Norway in the scenery of the Tysfjord - Hamarøy - Vesterålen, where mountains dive into the ocean. About 1800 million years ago, granites intruded gneisses that had already been deposited 2500 million years ago. Granites and gneisses are the hard and resistant rocks that create the wild and rugged fjord and mountainous landscape of Tysfjord.

When the granite intruded the gneisses, they were hot and molten. After intrusion they gradually cooled and crystallised. During the crystallisation the original granite melt formed feldspars, quartz and other minerals. The final rock that crystallised is a pure and coarse grained quartz aggregate, termed a quartz pegmatite. This is the raw material Norwegian Crystallites utilises at Drag in their processing plant. Norwegian Crystallites has access to large proven reserves easily available in modern underground mines as well as open pit mines.

Spruce Pine, North Carolina USA

The geological history of the Spruce Pine Mining District is fascinating. About 380 million years ago, the African Continent was being forced toward the North American Continent by plate tectonic forces. The forcing down of the Oceanic Crust underneath the North American Continent produced tremendous friction-generated heat from the two colliding continents. This friction-generated heat, in excess of 2,000°F, melted the surrounding rock 9 to 15 miles below the Earth's surface. This igneous molten rock was generated under intense pressure which hydraulically pushed its way through the cracks of the host rock, and also melted contact areas of the host rock, sucking up rich mineral forming fluids.

It took an estimated 100 million years for this deeply buried (and insulated) mass to cool and crystallize. The slowly cooling mineral crystals grew within the Spruce Pine District to some of the largest feldspar and mica crystals in the world. After molten emplacement and cooling, it took many more millions of years of Appalachian Mountain building and subsequent erosion to expose the deposits we see today.

The slowly cooling mineral crystals grew within the Spruce Pine District to some of the largest feldspar and mica crystals in the world.